Tag

carnival messiah

15 October 2018

Celebrating International Success at GCF

We are delighted that Carnival Messiah The Film & Documentary won the People’s Choice Award for Best Documentary at the Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival 2018.

Filmmaker Ashley Karrell with the other TT Film Festival Winners

Carnival Messiah, created by Geraldine Connor, was a cultural landmark in both Leeds and the Caribbean. Following its first incarnation as a student production at Wakefield Theatre Royal in 1994, the production empowered a whole generation of performers and entertained thousands of audience members in Leeds in 1999, 2002 and 2007. In 2003 and 2004 the show was performed in Trinidad at Queens Hall. As Express Trinidad reported at the time, “Carnival Messiah is the largest theatrical production, beyond Carnival itself, that Trinidad has ever hosted.”

Carnival Messiah features the work from Trinidad’s own Wayne Berkeley (Set Design), Clary Salandy (Costume Design), Carol La Chapelle (Choreographer), Michael Steel-Eytle (Choral Director), Dudley Nesbit (Steel Band Director) and the performing talents of Ronald Samm (The Voice of Truth), Nigel Wong (Minstrel), Marvin Smith (Lone Disciple), Anne Fridal (Mary), Alyson Brown (Pierrot / Dove of Peace), Christopher Sheppard (Carnival Messiah), Natalie Joseph-Settle (Shango Dancer), Sheldon Blackman (Chantuelle), Jonathan Bishop (Featured Cast), Caroline Neisha Taylor (Featured Cast) and Ella Andall (Mother Earth).

Carnival Messiah The Film & Documentary, created and directed by Leeds based film-maker, Ashley Karrell, had two sold out screenings at the Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival in September 2018.

Ashley said: “I’m so proud that Carnival Messiah The Film & Documentary won the Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival 2018 People’s Choice Award for Best Documentary. Thanks go out to all the Trinni’s who came and supported the film. Geraldine Connor would have been so happy that Carnival Messiah came home with more success. Special thanks go out to the Geraldine Connor Foundation, Harewood House and Leeds 2023 for all their support.”

Ashley with Jodi Marie from the TT Film Festival

Congratulations to Ashley and the GCF supporters who flew out to Trinidad for the Festival and spread the word about the work of the Foundation.

1 November 2017

Ashley Karrell on Geraldine’s ‘unique spirit’

Leeds based film-maker, Ashley Karrell, chatted to us about Geraldine Connor ahead of the screening of his film, ‘Carnival Messiah The Film & Documentary’, which is showing at Leeds Town Hall on Tuesday 7th November as part of the 31st Leeds International Film Festival…

Geraldine Connor was a professional mentor and personal friend. It was an honour to create the film and documentary that showcases all the fantastic aspects of her epic theatrical production of Carnival Messiah. This incredible musical spectacle shows some amazing carnival costumery, magnetic voices, and a creative cast of over 150 drawn from the local Leeds community and celebrated international artists.

 

The film marks the tenth anniversary of the original production, staged at Harewood House as part of the Trust’s celebrations of the bicentenary of the Abolition of the Transatlantic Slave Trade. A decade on, Carnival Messiah has taken its rightful place as a cultural landmark in Yorkshire’s arts scene and remains relevant today. Geraldine’s vision of empowerment and inclusivity through the arts lives on not only through the film, but also through the work of the many artists she mentored and inspired. It has been a privilege to ensure that her unique spirit and phenomenal impact are cherished forever.

Feel inspired too? Then come join us at Leeds Town Hall on Tuesday 7th November at 8.15pm for Carnival Messiah the Film & Documentary. More details here.

Carnival Messiah, Ashley Karrell, film, Geraldine Connor
Ashley Karrell at the premiere of ‘Carnival Messiah the Film’ at the West Yorkshire Playhouse, Sept 2017

14 September 2017

Carnival Messiah: Proof That This World Needs Art

The wonderful Anna, who has been working at GCF as part of the Undergraduate Research and Leadership Scholarship at the University of Leeds, reflects on the lasting legacy of Geraldine Connor’s magnum opus, Carnival Messiah

When I applied to do a summer research project on ‘The Impact and Legacy of Carnival Messiah’, I never imagined where it would take me. From being mic’d up to interview world class opera singers, to drinking tea with the Earl of Harewood, to spending an evening freestyling to Caribbean dancehall music with a group of strangers, I have been awed and inspired at every turn. After six weeks work I can safely say there is no simple way to describe my exploration of Carnival Messiah, but I’ll do my best.

Anna May at the Carnival Messiah the Film screening
Anna May at the Carnival Messiah the Film screening

Carnival Messiah was the pinnacle of Geraldine Connor’s artistic career, both an exceptional piece of theatre and a politically charged platform for social and personal transformation. With its beginnings as a student project in the 90s at Bretton Hall and developing into a huge scale professional production with performances in Leeds, London, and Trinidad, it has now been seen by over 750,000 people across the globe. Geraldine herself described it as a ‘spectacular musical showcase, featuring a multi-ethnic multitude of singers, musicians, masqueraders, dancers and actors […] the excitement, music and colour of Carnival blended with Handel’s most inspiring and exhilarating melodies’. The classical Christian story presented in an explosion of global art forms sounds bizarre and chaotic, and in many ways it was, but it worked.

Carnival Messiah 2017 1 - Photograph by Diane Howse
Carnival Messiah, Photograph by Diane Howse

Carnival Messiah was a dazzling spectacle that received standing ovations from audiences night after night, but it was also deeply enlightening and transformative. The production was embedded with history and politics; it aimed to educate the diverse community of Leeds about its rich mutli-cultural heritage, with a focus on Caribbean culture, looking at themes such as the migrant experience, the meaning of Carnival, and the history of the slave trade. Geraldine was concerned by the harmful divisions in our society, by the way cultural difference was being exploited for conflict and exclusion, rather than celebration and unity. She saw Carnival Messiah as a way to approach these issues in a non-confrontational way, while helping each participant to develop professional and life skills at the same time. Through art, Geraldine created a platform for empowerment, equality, and hope, and paved the way to space of ‘safety and well-being where all can co-exist in love, peace and harmony’.

Carnival Messiah 2017 5 - Photograph by Diane Howse
Carnival Messiah, Photograph by Diane Howse

Ten years since the last performance at Harewood House, and six years since Geraldine passed away, Carnival Messiah is still alive and kicking. Every single person (and I mean about a hundred of them) who have spoken to me about their experience seem buoyed up by some sort of external energy, a sense of truth and joy unique to Carnival Messiah. Each person has been on their own journey, both professional and personal, which continues to impact them even now. Every interaction, the face-to-face interviews, the phone calls, even the emails, have been full of life and taught me a multitude of unexpected lessons about the creative world, but also about life more generally. I feel privileged to have had my eyes opened to the very special world of Carnival Messiah and am grateful to everyone I have met and who made this possible.

Carnival Messiah is the perfect example of good art. While drama, dance, music, design etc. may be seen primarily as a creative outlet, a source of entertainment, or a showcase of talent, we must not forget its powerful potential to enrich and transform people’s lives. To me, this is what art is, and this is what we should be striving for.

If you were involved in Carnival Messiah and would like to share your experiences about the production with us, please get in touch: info@gcfoundation.co.uk.

28 July 2017

Remember Carnival Messiah? Anna wants to Speak to you!

Hi, my name is Anna. I’m currently studying English and Sociology at the University of Leeds, and am lucky to have the opportunity of working with the Geraldine Connor Foundation over the next two years as part of the Undergraduate Research and Leadership Scholarship (UGRLS). Over the summer I’m exploring the impact and legacy of Geraldine’s creation ‘Carnival Messiah’, with a particular focus on the production at Harewood House in 2007.

Anna

Carnival Messiah was widely praised for its community engagement, bringing professionals, semi-professionals locals and international artists on to one stage. To this day the foundation is inundated with stories of the effect Carnival Messiah had on individuals.

I’m interested in learning from artists, participants and audiences about their experiences, the influence the production had on their lives, and also their personal memories in order to try and capture the joy of the production. In building an archive of material about ‘Carnival Messiah’, not only am I hoping to record and celebrate its legacy, but I’m also hoping to demonstrate the importance of the arts more generally. Especially in a time when funding is being cut at every corner, I believe that the arts should be valued in all walks of life, both as a creative outlet and as a powerful tool for personal growth and social change.

If you took part in Carnival Messiah, or even if you simply went to see it and would like to share your experience then we’d love to hear it. Get in touch by emailing info@gcfoundation.co.uk with your name, contact details and a brief description of how you were involved, and we’ll go from there.

 

I hope to hear from you soon!

Anna